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Our guide to the Roseland Peninsula

Few places compare to the Roseland Peninsula, one of the most delightful and unspoilt areas of the county, a mix of beautiful beaches and breathtaking cliff top walks, meandering rivers and lush green countryside; it has been designated part of Cornwall’s Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty for the quality of its landscape and coastal scenery.

It’s only a short drive from the capital city Truro before you’re immersed in pretty Cornish lanes and head in to a part of Cornwall reminiscent of days gone by. Local farm shops sell produce grown and reared in nearby fields, honesty boxes are dotted along country lanes selling free range eggs, homemade jams, freshly picked flowers or a glut of garden beans; but ultimately all lanes lead you to the coast and arguably some of Cornwall’s best beaches, that are never crowded and always stunning, no matter the time of year.

Probably the most famous Roseland village is St Mawes, a fashionable fishing village curving around a sheltered bay and home to the famous Hotel Tresanton and Idle Rocks. But there are many other chocolate box villages to explore, the picturesque working harbours or Portscatho and Portloe and the famous roundhouses at Veryan, to name just a few. If food is your thing this area has many culinary delights to offer, from an array of traditional village pubs, to tucked away gems like the Hidden Hut at Portcurnick beach or the Michelin starred restaurant at the Driftwood Hotel.

The peninsula also has great walking routes especially along the SW coast path whilst the coastal waters are as popular with families for the safe bathing and rock-pooling as they are with yachtsmen, windsurfers and canoeists. The Roseland really is the gem in Cornwall’s crown.

 

If you’d like to know more about St Mawes you can see our area guide here>

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